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  1. The White Rajah of Sarawak | St Joseph's Family of Schools, Kuching
  2. An Original Production
  3. 2 Hollywood Actors Have Been Cast In The Biopic About Sarawak Rajah James Brooke

What matters is how well the relationship between the flamboyant Brooke and the rather more reserved Williamson is portrayed. The author gives a good insight into Victorian attitudes to homosexuality and Willamson is a good narrator. I reached the end of the novel with a strong sense of wanting to know more about the place, the historical background and the characters, which is always a good sign when finishing a historical novel.

Nov 26, Nancy rated it liked it Shelves: first-reads. One of the benefits I've received from the First Reads program is that it often takes me out of my reading rut; this book most definitely was one of those.

The White Rajah of Sarawak | St Joseph's Family of Schools, Kuching

This well-written biographical novel is a young man's adventure story as well as his moral coming-of-age. But it is also a tale of love and of war. I was well into the book before I realized it was a homosexual love story but it was presented as a romantic reminissance and the love story was necessary to put the narrator's point-of One of the benefits I've received from the First Reads program is that it often takes me out of my reading rut; this book most definitely was one of those.

I was well into the book before I realized it was a homosexual love story but it was presented as a romantic reminissance and the love story was necessary to put the narrator's point-of-view in perspective as he detailed the exploits of his mentor and lover, The White Rajah. My enjoyment of the book would have been greater if I had a deeper interest in the history of the region.

View 2 comments. Jan 10, Jaretta rated it really liked it. I loved this book. At first I was wary since I don't usually read naval stories.

An Original Production

While the story does have a naval backdrop, it's really about power, revenge, politics, and love. When I finished the book, I wished there was a sequel! Jan 03, J. Sep 01, Hal Len rated it liked it. Picture heavy mist - picture preparations for a surprise attack Tom Williams describes this and other battles as he brings the story of James Brooke alive. Yes, I did feel it came to life. I could imagine the scenes and feel for those taking part.

Why these battles happened, will never be known. Was it because James Brooke wished to look after the interest of his people or was it something to do with private gains? It is always good to be careful about being too black and white in Picture heavy mist - picture preparations for a surprise attack What is true, is the fact that James Brooke indeed ruled an area on the island of Borneo from In the latter part of the rule he, however, spent a lot of time in England where he was buried in Dartmoor.

Both instigated measures that helped the country towards prosperity. A male one. There has been suggestions as to his sexuality. It is, however, surprising that Williams would have instigated John Williamson as the partner-narrator. Why surprising you may ask? I find this so, because John is portrayed as being in conflict both with his sexuality and with his part in the battles. It is this that brings the four stars I would have otherwise given down to three. Also Tom Williams should have trusted his readers more to judge for themselves what are believable events and what are not.

One could even ask how close to real events should the author stick to, if he is basing his story on real characters of history. Tom Williams succeeds in raising my interest.

2 Hollywood Actors Have Been Cast In The Biopic About Sarawak Rajah James Brooke

I googled James Brooke after I finished the book. I even noticed there are several other books about this White Rajah. There is also an interesting similarity to other non-native fighters and the way British traders were asked to help with local battles and wars elsewhere. Having read Wrecked in the Feejees and Pacific Viking gave me a wider perspective for this reading.


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Now should I read Lord Jim again forgotten in the years past , as this might actually have a connection with James Brooke? But how about you? Should you read The White Rajah? Yes, if you are interested in colonial history. Yes, if you like good stories.

test.guiadoexcel.com.br Yes, if you like to read about the lives of real people? Yes, if you want a slightly different book. Yes, if you are interested in small battles. Yes, if you collect stamps. Yes, if you are British and like to know about your history. Nov 13, Penny Hampson rated it it was amazing. A fictional account in the form of a memoir of the exploits of James Brooke, who became the Rajah of Sarawak. Looking for adventure, Brooke heads to the South China Seas with his lover, John Williamson, the author of the memoir. This is the story of how he is appointed as Rajah by the Sultan of Borneo and how he has to negotiate the complexities of life there, dealing with the different political factions and ethnic groups.

The author has obviously undertaken a lot of research, his descriptions of the geography, the history, and the politics is thorough and evocative; one certainly got the sense of the atmosphere of mistrust and manoeuvrings that were taking place at the time. Beautifully written, this is a compelling story about an enigmatic man and his influence on the foundations of trade and commerce in the South China Seas. Dec 09, Tracy R. Franklin rated it it was amazing. I really enjoyed this book. Williams has a rare gift for effortlessly folding technical concepts into a narrative, and his explanations of the politics of both the era and the area were simple and insightful at the same time.

One of my great difficulties when reading is trying to create mental maps of settings - the layouts of rooms, for instance, or towns. Williams, through his narrator, does not overwhelm the reader with superfluous details that make this difficult. I was never surp I really enjoyed this book. I was never surprised with annoyances like a character who turned left into what was, in my mind, a wall, or a window that faced a bank when I thought it faced the water. Yet I could see banks, the jungle, the clearings; I could smell the dank mud from which the tree roots emerged.

I, who know nothing of ships and rigging, could see the crew struggling in a storm. The storyline itself is fascinating. I had not heard of the White Rajah of Sarawak before this, and was struck by two common adages: The first, found in many forms, was "The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Sep 29, Willo Font rated it it was ok. Great story; Borneo , 's, pirates, wild tribes, betrayal and battles.


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What's missing? I just found this review on amazon aboout this book. By the way the guy who wrote it has some great pirate books. Tom Williams knows a great deal about James Brooke, Rajah of Sarawak, and he wants to tell you all about it. Unfortunately, apparently no one ever told him that the first rul Wow Unfortunately, apparently no one ever told him that the first rule of creative writing is "show, don't tell. Adopting the persona of a fictional young seaman who becomes Brooke's lover and interpretor, Williams masters the language of Victorian memoirs, but manages to make the man known as 'the White Rajah' as dull as dishwater.

You'd think battle scenes, murder by poison, and a lover's first kiss would be inherently interesting, but not the way Mr. Williams tells it. Kei, author of Fire Dragon Jul 31, Michael Joseph rated it liked it Shelves: gay-historical.

[Borneo] Kingdom of Sarawak - a short history

On the whole, this appears to be a well researched book, full of rich details about Brooke's adventures that made him the White Rajah. The one disappointment I had, and why I give it three stars rather than four, is that the relationship between the narrator and Brooke is related in very timid detail. We're given enough to assume that the two had a physical relationship, but not much more than that.

I'm sure there's an argument that the 'discretion' is in line with the first person narrative of On the whole, this appears to be a well researched book, full of rich details about Brooke's adventures that made him the White Rajah. I'm sure there's an argument that the 'discretion' is in line with the first person narrative of an early nineteenth century man, but I would have forgiven the author for straying outside the lines in exchange for a little more detail. Not that I want it to be explicit, but a little more than hugs and kisses between the two characters would make the story a lot better.

Oct 01, Nan Hawthorne rated it really liked it Shelves: glbtq. James Brook, the White Rajah, is a historical figure. Much of what is in the book is true, though Williams' interpretation of Brook's gay relationship with the narrator is his own story.